Electrical Safety

All electric lines, transformers, sub-stations and other equipment should be treated as “live” and extremely dangerous. Do not let children play where they may be injured.

Keep these life-saving tips in mind:

  • Underground Lines: Call before you dig. If you hit an underground line, you could be seriously injured. By law, you could also be liable for damages. Before digging or moving earth, call 811, the local one-call utility locating service to locate all underground utility lines.
  • Tree Safety: Work and play safely around trees. Contact Pee Dee Electric before pruning, trimming, or cutting down trees that are near overhead lines. Don't let children climb trees that are near overhead lines.
  • High-Voltage Towers: Stay clear. Never touch or climb on these towers. Overhead wires and other tower equipment carry very high-voltage electricity.
  • Overhead Lines: Keep your distance! When carrying and using ladders and other long tools, make sure to keep them at least 10 feet away from all overhead lines-including the line from the power pole to your home.
  • Substations: Stay out. Tell children that if a ball or toy gets into a substation they should tell an adult to call PDEC. Never try to retrieve the toy yourself.
  • Kites and Balloons: Fly them away from power lines. If they contact power lines, it could cause shock or fire. Play it safe and keep them away from overhead lines.
  • Pad-Mounted Transformers: Don't dig near them or try to open them. Transformers are contained inside sturdy metal cabinets that are locked for safety. Never sit on or near them. If you find one that's unlocked, call Pee Dee Electric Cooperative immediately.
.

811 Call Before You DigCall Before You Dig!

No matter how large or small the digging project is, it is important to "Call Before You Dig" or "Click Before You Dig!" By making one simple FREE phone call or by  filling out an online form you can protect you and your community from costly fines, repairs, personal injury or inconvenient outages.

At least 3 business days prior to digging, call 811 or 888-721-7877. A representative will record the location of the digging site and notify Pee Dee Electric and other member utility companies of your intent to dig. Each utility will  send a representative to your dig site to mark the location of their lines. Once your lines have been marked, you may begin carefully to dig, keeping in mind a 2 1/2 foot allowance on either side of the markings.

Failure to call before digging results in 200,000 unintentional cut lines annually. Don't let your project become part of this statistic.

You may request locate service by entering the 811 website or by calling 811. Either way, your underground utility lines will be marked.

.

Generator Safety

Using a generator can be very useful, but also very dangerous. When connecting a generator to a main electrical supply, a professional is needed.

Important safety precautions when using a portable generator:

  • Read all instructions carefully and follow the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Never run your generator indoors or in your garage. Generators should only be run in a well-ventilated area.
  • Plug appliances directly into the generator using heavy duty, properly grounded, extension cords.
  • Make sure extension cords are not frayed or worn.
  • Limit the electrical load placed on the generator to no more than the recommended wattage.
  • Do not connect generator directly to your home's main fuse box or circuit panel.
  • Use the generator only when necessary.
  • Turn the generator off while you sleep and when you are away from home.
  • If you have any questions about how to properly use a portable electric generator, contact the manufacturer or a licensed electrician for assistance.
Generator Connection Vital - Small
Proper Generator Connection Vital

Proper Generator Connection Vital
If you are a licensed electrician, the only acceptable way of connecting a generator to your home's electric system is through a double-pole, double-throw transfer switch.

This switch disconnects your electric system from PDEC's power lines and will:

  • Eliminate the possibility of allowing your generator to send electricity onto the cooperative's line, which is extremely dangerous and potentially deadly for our linemen who are working on a line that is supposed to be de-energized.
  • Eliminate the possibility of allowing restored power from Pee Dee Electric to destroy an improperly connected generator.
.

Preparing For An Outage

At Pee Dee Electric we do our best to keep the power coming to your home or business 24/7. There are times, however, when your electricity goes off unexpectedly. Thunderstorms, ice storms and traffic accidents are just some the occasions that leave us without the convenience of electricity. Everyone needs to be prepared for those few times when the lights go off.

Here are some tips to help you stay ready:

  • Keep batteries of all sizes on hand.
  • Have blankets and heavy socks available for all family members, especially in winter months.
  • Be sure you have candles and other forms of light, like flashlights, readily available in your home. And don't forget about those solar lights you use to outline your driveway or walk. They can be a safe and comforting form of light at night and be fully recharged by the sun the next day.
  • Make sure you have battery operated or hand cranked radios and flashlights. If the outage is caused by a storm, radios will keep you informed.
  • If there are children in the family, make sure you have several board games and decks of cards to play. Activities help make the time go faster.
  • Always keep canned food and snacks on hand in the pantry. Peanut butter and saltine crackers go a long way! Don't open your freezer or refrigerator any more than necessary. The more cold air you let out, the sooner food inside will go bad. It's also a good idea to have two hand-operated can openers - one for use, plus a spare. Bottled water is always good to have ready.
  • Never use a charcoal grill inside.
.

Electrical Safety in the Home and Garden

Electrical appliances in the home are part of everyday life - from the toaster, to heaters, hair curler, blow dryer, microwave, television, and stereo. If these appliances are not maintained properly, they can pose a serious safety hazard.

Here are some safety precautions for electrical appliances in the home:

  • Electrical appliances should not be used around water.
  • When carrying appliances, they should be held by the handle, not the cord.
  • Appliances that get hot such as heaters, toasters, and light bulbs should be kept away from materials that can burn.
  • Small appliances should be turned off or unplugged when not in use.
  • If an appliance repeatedly blows a fuse, trips a circuit breaker or has given you a shock, unplug it and have the appliance repaired or replaced.

Here are some tips for practicing safety with electrical and other appliances outside of the home:

  • Electrical tools used for yard work should be labeled for outdoor use.
  • Disconnect spark plug wires on gasoline-powered tools before making adjustments or clearing jams.
  • Be sure power tools are turned off and made inoperable if they must be left unattended to prevent use by children.
  • Handle gas carefully. Never fill gasoline tanks while machinery is on or when equipment is still hot. Wipe up spills. Store gas in an approved container away from the house. Finally, never smoke or use any type of flame around gasoline or gasoline-powered equipment
  • Never work with electrical power tools in wet or damp conditions.
  • Be sure that extension cords are in good condition, are rated for outdoor use, and are the proper gauge for the electrical current capacity of the tool.
  • Inspect your mower periodically for potential hazards.
.

Meters and Equipment

It is important to provide access to Pee Dee Electric's men and equipment. If you enclose an underground service transformer or a power pole with a fence or shrubbery, you must leave a ten-foot opening to allow for equipment repairs. Your meter must be accessible as well. All plantings must be at least four feet from transformers, poles and meters. Remember when you plant to allow for the mature size of the planting.

Home emergencies and repairs can require meters to be disconnected. Call the PDEC office to have your service interrupted by a trained professional. Unauthorized meter tampering is against South Carolina law.

For more information, please contact us.

* This is a printer friendly version of the original page, made to save you ink and paper.

Pee Dee Electric Cooperative

Electrical Safety

All electric lines, transformers, sub-stations and other equipment should be treated as “live” and extremely dangerous. Do not let children play where they may be injured.

Keep these life-saving tips in mind:

  • Underground Lines: Call before you dig. If you hit an underground line, you could be seriously injured. By law, you could also be liable for damages. Before digging or moving earth, call 811, the local one-call utility locating service to locate all underground utility lines.
  • Tree Safety: Work and play safely around trees. Contact Pee Dee Electric before pruning, trimming, or cutting down trees that are near overhead lines. Don't let children climb trees that are near overhead lines.
  • High-Voltage Towers: Stay clear. Never touch or climb on these towers. Overhead wires and other tower equipment carry very high-voltage electricity.
  • Overhead Lines: Keep your distance! When carrying and using ladders and other long tools, make sure to keep them at least 10 feet away from all overhead lines-including the line from the power pole to your home.
  • Substations: Stay out. Tell children that if a ball or toy gets into a substation they should tell an adult to call PDEC. Never try to retrieve the toy yourself.
  • Kites and Balloons: Fly them away from power lines. If they contact power lines, it could cause shock or fire. Play it safe and keep them away from overhead lines.
  • Pad-Mounted Transformers: Don't dig near them or try to open them. Transformers are contained inside sturdy metal cabinets that are locked for safety. Never sit on or near them. If you find one that's unlocked, call Pee Dee Electric Cooperative immediately.
.

811 Call Before You DigCall Before You Dig!

No matter how large or small the digging project is, it is important to "Call Before You Dig" or "Click Before You Dig!" By making one simple FREE phone call or by  filling out an online form you can protect you and your community from costly fines, repairs, personal injury or inconvenient outages.

At least 3 business days prior to digging, call 811 or 888-721-7877. A representative will record the location of the digging site and notify Pee Dee Electric and other member utility companies of your intent to dig. Each utility will  send a representative to your dig site to mark the location of their lines. Once your lines have been marked, you may begin carefully to dig, keeping in mind a 2 1/2 foot allowance on either side of the markings.

Failure to call before digging results in 200,000 unintentional cut lines annually. Don't let your project become part of this statistic.

You may request locate service by entering the 811 website or by calling 811. Either way, your underground utility lines will be marked.

.

Generator Safety

Using a generator can be very useful, but also very dangerous. When connecting a generator to a main electrical supply, a professional is needed.

Important safety precautions when using a portable generator:

  • Read all instructions carefully and follow the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Never run your generator indoors or in your garage. Generators should only be run in a well-ventilated area.
  • Plug appliances directly into the generator using heavy duty, properly grounded, extension cords.
  • Make sure extension cords are not frayed or worn.
  • Limit the electrical load placed on the generator to no more than the recommended wattage.
  • Do not connect generator directly to your home's main fuse box or circuit panel.
  • Use the generator only when necessary.
  • Turn the generator off while you sleep and when you are away from home.
  • If you have any questions about how to properly use a portable electric generator, contact the manufacturer or a licensed electrician for assistance.
Generator Connection Vital - Small
Proper Generator Connection Vital

Proper Generator Connection Vital
If you are a licensed electrician, the only acceptable way of connecting a generator to your home's electric system is through a double-pole, double-throw transfer switch.

This switch disconnects your electric system from PDEC's power lines and will:

  • Eliminate the possibility of allowing your generator to send electricity onto the cooperative's line, which is extremely dangerous and potentially deadly for our linemen who are working on a line that is supposed to be de-energized.
  • Eliminate the possibility of allowing restored power from Pee Dee Electric to destroy an improperly connected generator.
.

Preparing For An Outage

At Pee Dee Electric we do our best to keep the power coming to your home or business 24/7. There are times, however, when your electricity goes off unexpectedly. Thunderstorms, ice storms and traffic accidents are just some the occasions that leave us without the convenience of electricity. Everyone needs to be prepared for those few times when the lights go off.

Here are some tips to help you stay ready:

  • Keep batteries of all sizes on hand.
  • Have blankets and heavy socks available for all family members, especially in winter months.
  • Be sure you have candles and other forms of light, like flashlights, readily available in your home. And don't forget about those solar lights you use to outline your driveway or walk. They can be a safe and comforting form of light at night and be fully recharged by the sun the next day.
  • Make sure you have battery operated or hand cranked radios and flashlights. If the outage is caused by a storm, radios will keep you informed.
  • If there are children in the family, make sure you have several board games and decks of cards to play. Activities help make the time go faster.
  • Always keep canned food and snacks on hand in the pantry. Peanut butter and saltine crackers go a long way! Don't open your freezer or refrigerator any more than necessary. The more cold air you let out, the sooner food inside will go bad. It's also a good idea to have two hand-operated can openers - one for use, plus a spare. Bottled water is always good to have ready.
  • Never use a charcoal grill inside.
.

Electrical Safety in the Home and Garden

Electrical appliances in the home are part of everyday life - from the toaster, to heaters, hair curler, blow dryer, microwave, television, and stereo. If these appliances are not maintained properly, they can pose a serious safety hazard.

Here are some safety precautions for electrical appliances in the home:

  • Electrical appliances should not be used around water.
  • When carrying appliances, they should be held by the handle, not the cord.
  • Appliances that get hot such as heaters, toasters, and light bulbs should be kept away from materials that can burn.
  • Small appliances should be turned off or unplugged when not in use.
  • If an appliance repeatedly blows a fuse, trips a circuit breaker or has given you a shock, unplug it and have the appliance repaired or replaced.

Here are some tips for practicing safety with electrical and other appliances outside of the home:

  • Electrical tools used for yard work should be labeled for outdoor use.
  • Disconnect spark plug wires on gasoline-powered tools before making adjustments or clearing jams.
  • Be sure power tools are turned off and made inoperable if they must be left unattended to prevent use by children.
  • Handle gas carefully. Never fill gasoline tanks while machinery is on or when equipment is still hot. Wipe up spills. Store gas in an approved container away from the house. Finally, never smoke or use any type of flame around gasoline or gasoline-powered equipment
  • Never work with electrical power tools in wet or damp conditions.
  • Be sure that extension cords are in good condition, are rated for outdoor use, and are the proper gauge for the electrical current capacity of the tool.
  • Inspect your mower periodically for potential hazards.
.

Meters and Equipment

It is important to provide access to Pee Dee Electric's men and equipment. If you enclose an underground service transformer or a power pole with a fence or shrubbery, you must leave a ten-foot opening to allow for equipment repairs. Your meter must be accessible as well. All plantings must be at least four feet from transformers, poles and meters. Remember when you plant to allow for the mature size of the planting.

Home emergencies and repairs can require meters to be disconnected. Call the PDEC office to have your service interrupted by a trained professional. Unauthorized meter tampering is against South Carolina law.

For more information, please contact us.



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